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Bauhaus Ballet: A Dance of Geometry

Open Culture - 16 augustus 2018 - 6:59pm

During the past month, the Great Big Story has released a series of videos that revisit the design aesthetic of the Bauhaus movement. Their first video explored the radical buildings designed by Bauhaus architects. A second focused on the legacy of minimalist Bauhaus furniture. And now a third takes as its subject Oskar Schlemmer's 1922 “Triadic Ballet”--a ballet famous for putting geometry and structure into dance. The video above shows the "Bayerisches Junior Ballet München as they prepare to bring Bauhaus center stage again." You can watch a full recreation of the ballet and learn much more about Schlemmer's experimental production by reading this post from our archive.

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Related Content:

Watch an Avant-Garde Bauhaus Ballet in Brilliant Color, the Triadic Ballet, First Staged by Oskar Schlemmer in 1922.

An Oral History of the Bauhaus: Hear Rare Interviews (in English) with Walter Gropius, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe & More

Download Original Bauhaus Books & Journals for Free: Gropius, Klee, Kandinsky, Moholy-Nagy & More

32,000+ Bauhaus Art Objects Made Available Online by Harvard Museum Website

Bauhaus, Modernism & Other Design Movements Explained by New Animated Video Series

The Female Pioneers of the Bauhaus Art Movement: Discover Gertrud Arndt, Marianne Brandt, Anni Albers & Other Forgotten Innovators

Bauhaus Ballet: A Dance of Geometry is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

Bommen en granaten in Amsterdam

Binnenllands Bestuur - 16 augustus 2018 - 4:02pm
Het is deze week dagelijkse usance in Amsterdam: een explosief voor, bij of aan de deur van een (horeca)onderneming, de straat wordt afgezet en de Explosieven Opruimingsdienst Defensie ruimt het op. Later wordt besloten of de onderneming wordt gesloten. …

How Aleister Crowley, the Infamous Occultist, Led the First Attempt to Reach the Summit of K2 (1902)

Open Culture - 16 augustus 2018 - 4:00pm

It sounds like the plot of a Werner Herzog film: Aleister Crowley, heir to a brewing fortune and “flamboyant, bisexual drug fiend with a fascination for the occult,” meets “son of a well-known Jewish Socialist” Oscar Eckenstein, “a chemist turned railway engineer.” The two strike up a friendship over their mutual passion for mountaineering, and, in four years time, co-lead an expedition to reach the summit of K2, the second highest mountain in the world.

The descriptions of these characters come from Mick Conefrey’s The Ghosts of K2: The Race for the Summit of the World’s Most Deadly Mountain, a book detailing the many grueling attempts, many deaths, and few successes, in over a century of climbs to the mountain’s peak. Crowley and Eckenstein’s expedition, undertaken in 1902, was the first. Though unsuccessful, their effort remains a legendary feat of historical bravery, or hubris, or insanity—an ascent up the face of what climber George Bell called “a savage mountain that tries to kill you.”

In an interview with National Geographic, Conefrey sums up the doomed expedition:

 In those days, nobody had a clue about what it was going to be like. They thought they would go to the Himalayas and knock off K2 in a couple of days. But as the expedition proceeded, it started falling apart. Eckenstein, the leader, had a bad respiratory infection. Crowley had malaria and spent most of the time in his tent with a high fever. At one point he got so delirious, he started waving his revolver at other members of the team. 

There are many other Herzogian touches. In his book Fallen Giants, Maurice Isserman describes the team—also consisting of a novice Englishman, a Swiss doctor, and two experienced Austrian climbers—as “unreasonably burdened by three tons of luggage.” Some of that unnecessary burden came from a “several-volume library” Crowley “intended to haul onto the glacier.” The others “objected to the superfluous weight, but Crowley had read enough Joseph Conrad to know what happened to those who let go of their hold on civilization in the wild.” The library stayed, and a train of 200 porters hauled the team’s luggage to Baltoro Glacier. (See Crowley in a photo from the expedition above, presumably stricken with malaria.)

Prior to setting off for K2 Eckenstein and Crowley had climbed volcanoes in Mexico, then the latter had traveled to San Francisco, Hawaii, Japan, Sri Lanka, and India—along the way having affairs, learning meditation, and developing a “lifelong devotion to Shiva, the Hindu god of destruction." While it takes a certain rare personality to subject themselves to the rigors of scaling a mountain almost five miles high, Crowley—notorious for his “magick," sexual adventures, drug use, lewd poetry, and founding of a religious order—is arguably the most out-there personality in the history of a very extreme sport.

But mountaineering "is not a normal pursuit,” writes Scottish climber Robin Campbell, “and we should not be too surprised to find its adepts showing odd behavior in other spheres of life.” Like all devotees of strenuous, death-defying pursuits, Crowley “wanted extreme experiences,” says Conefrey, “where he pushed himself to the limit.” It just so happened that he wanted to push far beyond the natural and human worlds. After the failed K2 attempt, he would only make one more daring expedition with Eckenstein, in 1905, a climb up the Himalayan mountain of Kangchenjunga, the third highest mountain in the world.

On the trip, Crowley, the leader, reportedly treated the local porters with brutal arrogance, and when three of them were killed along with one of the expedition members, he refused to help, writing to a Darjeeling newspaper, “a mountain ‘accident’ of this sort is one of the things for which I have no sympathy whatever.” He left the following day and gave up mountaineering, devoting the rest of his life to his occult interests and the exploits that earned him the tabloid reputation as “the wickedest man in the world.”

K2 was finally conquered by two Italian climbers in 1954, who reached the summit, frostbitten and half-mad, as Joanna Kavenna puts it in a review of Conefrey's spellbinding book, "in a moment of sublime anticlimax."

Related Content:

The Surreal Paintings of the Occult Magician, Writer & Mountaineer, Aleister Crowley

Aleister Crowley: The Wickedest Man in the World Documents the Life of the Bizarre Occultist, Poet & Mountaineer

Aleister Crowley & William Butler Yeats Get into an Occult Battle, Pitting White Magic Against Black Magic (1900)

Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness

How Aleister Crowley, the Infamous Occultist, Led the First Attempt to Reach the Summit of K2 (1902) is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

Kunstbloem probaat middel tegen zwerfvuil

Binnenllands Bestuur - 16 augustus 2018 - 2:32pm
Word je als gemeente gek van het anoniem achtergelaten zwerfvuil bij ondergrondse afvalcontainers? De oplossing is simpeler dan gedacht. Een mat van kunstgras voorzien van kunstbloemen blijkt het gedrag van notoire afvalstorters te kunnen veranderen.

MLA members launch petition calling on Judith Butler to resign as President-elect of the organization...

Leiter Reports: A Philosophy Blog - 16 augustus 2018 - 1:57pm
...in light of her apologetics for sexual harassers, notably in the Ronell case, but let's not forget an earlier incident. As Martha Nussbaum observed years ago, well before these incidents, Butler's "hip quietism...collaborates with evil." This has turned out to... Brian Leiter

Wijkteams komen deskundig personeel tekort

Binnenllands Bestuur - 16 augustus 2018 - 1:03pm
De wijkzorg voor patiënten met complexe psychiatrische problemen komt ernstig in de knel door een gebrek aan deskundig personeel. Dat blijkt uit een onderzoek van gezondheidsinstituut Nivel, onder wijkverpleegkundigen, verzorgenden, …

See the First Ever Video of Elvis Costello Performing, Summer 1974

Open Culture - 16 augustus 2018 - 1:00pm

The setting: London. In particular, Stepney, London E1. The year, a warm summer in 1974, July 21 to be exact. And a very early video camera, only able to shoot in black and white, records the events of the E1 Festival, a free day out for families, restless teens, and bell bottomed, long-haired youth enjoying the sun. There’s Indian musicians, face painting, carnival games, jazz bands, folk dancing, and a “Wellie Boot Chucking Competition”. You know, “the lot,” as the English would say. But then, around 40 minutes in, the videographer decides to shoot the pub rock band playing on the main stage.

If the bespectacled 19 year old looks and sounds a bit familiar, well luvvies, you’re not seeing things. This is the first filmed appearance of a young Elvis Costello, beclad in very fetching dungarees and fronting his first band Flip City. This was their third ever gig, according to the Elvis Costello fan site.

A full three years before Declan MacManus would change his name and burst upon the scene with My Aim Is True, here he is paying his dues.

Flip City was Costello’s second group, the first being a folk rock duo called Rusty that played John Prine, Jesse Winchester, and Van Morrison covers in between their own songs. After Costello split from Liverpool and left for London, he jumped on the pub rock bandwagon that was already formed around Nick Lowe, Dr. Feelgood, and Brinsley Schwarz, mixing up Americana and R’n’B covers with very British originals. They even recorded demos a few years after this gig, which were widely bootlegged until most of them appeared on bonus tracks on various CD reissues. (You can listen to them here.)

But back to 1974. We have no record of their full set, but the two songs on the video are from the Coasters’ “I’m a Hog for You” (the B-side of “Charlie Brown” but covered by Screaming Lord Sutch in 1963) and from the Isley Brothers, “This Old Heart of Mine,” a Motown staple. Despite Costello’s encyclopediac knowledge of music, he never again played these two songs live again.

It might be 20/20 hindsight, but one can already hear the talent and the confidence (or at least mock confidence) that would soon propel the young man into the charts. The rest, as they say, is much better than winning the wellie chucking contest.

Related Content:

New Wave Music–DEVO, Talking Heads, Blondie, Elvis Costello–Gets Introduced to America by ABC’s TV Show, 20/20 (1979)

The Stunt That Got Elvis Costello Banned From Saturday Night Live (1977)

Elvis Costello Sings “Penny Lane” for Sir Paul McCartney at The White House

Ted Mills is a freelance writer on the arts who currently hosts the artist interview-based FunkZone Podcast and is the producer of KCRW's Curious Coast. You can also follow him on Twitter at @tedmills, read his other arts writing at tedmills.com and/or watch his films here.

See the First Ever Video of Elvis Costello Performing, Summer 1974 is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

Wassenaar hard op de vingers getikt door rechtbank in Wmo-zaak

Binnenllands Bestuur - 16 augustus 2018 - 12:49pm
De gemeente Wassenaar kan zonder keukentafelgesprek geen besluit nemen over een ondersteuningsaanvraag van een rolstoelgebonden man, oordeelt de rechter. Het medisch advies waarop de gemeente haar besluit baseerde, deugde ook al niet. Daarnaast kreeg …

Afgifte vergunningen nieuwbouwwoningen daalt

Binnenllands Bestuur - 16 augustus 2018 - 11:01am
De verlening van bouwvergunningen voor nieuwbouwwoningen is de eerste zes maanden van dit jaar gedaald. Naar verwachting blijft de productie dit jaar steken op maximaal 67.000 woningen.

Burgemeester Nijmegen sluit woning gezin

Binnenllands Bestuur - 16 augustus 2018 - 10:11am
Een Nijmeegs gezin mag voorlopig hun eigen woning in de wijk Hegdambroek niet meer in. Burgemeester Hubert Bruls heeft de woning en het perceel rondom woensdag voor onbepaalde tijd gesloten, omdat de veiligheid van het gezin, maar ook die van de buurt …

How David Lynch Got Creative Inspiration? By Drinking a Milkshake at Bob’s Big Boy, Every Single Day, for Seven Straight Years

Open Culture - 16 augustus 2018 - 10:00am

"It is no secret that David Lynch, the writer-director-composer-painter, has an unusual relationship with Bob's Big Boy," begins a 1999 Los Angeles Times article on the auteur of films like Eraserhead and Blue Velvet. "For seven years in the 1980s he ate lunch there every day, ordering cup after cup of over-sweetened coffee and a single chocolate milkshake while scribbling notes on Bob's little square napkins." He took pains, notes reporter Amy Wallace, "to arrive at Bob's at precisely 2:30 p.m. each day. The reason: It increased the odds that he would encounter perfection."

"If you go earlier, at lunchtime, they're making a lot of chocolate milkshakes. The mixture has to cool in a machine, but if it doesn't sit in there long enough — when they're serving a lot of them — it's runny," Wallace quotes Lynch as saying. "At 2:30, the milkshake mixture hasn't been sitting there too long, but you've got a chance for it to be just great."

For his pains, he received "only three perfect milkshakes out of more than 2,500. But that wasn't the point. For Lynch, it was enough to know he had set the stage for excellence to occur," believing that "whether with milkshakes or movies," one "must make room for inspiration to strike — to lay the proper groundwork for greatness to take hold."

When the 1980s British television series The Incredibly Strange Film Show devoted an episode to Lynch, it naturally went to Los Angeles not just to interview him but to shoot some footage at Bob's, the sacred space itself. In the clip at the top of the post, you can see host Jonathan Ross, seated in one of the retro diner's booths and Lynchianly dressed in a white shirt buttoned all the way up, describe how, after an "all-American lunch," the director would embark on "marathon coffee-drinking sessions. Fueled by the caffeine and his excessive sugar intake, he'd then spend the afternoon writing down ideas for movies on the napkins helpfully provided by Bob."

In the interview that follows, Lynch himself confirms all this. "I was into Bob's halfway through Eraserhead," he says, establishing the chronology. "The end of Dune" — his traumatic, failed experience with big-budget studio production — "was pretty much the end of Bob's." Even Lynch's daughter Jennifer, for a time her father's Bob's-going companion, reminisces about "the drawing on napkins" and the "tons of coffee with lots of sugar." In this late-80s interview, Lynch describes himself as "heavily into sugar. I call it 'granulated happiness.' It's just a great help, a friend."

Lynch's reputation for drinking Bob's milkshakes long outlasted his actual habit. Charlie Rose makes a point of asking about it in the clip in the middle of the post, prompting Lynch to explain the reasoning behind his daily trips — both literally and metaphorically, since when Rose asks if all the sugar got him high, Lynch admits that "it is like a drug, I suppose, because it revs you up." Though by all accounts still a prodigious drinker of coffee and smoker of cigarettes, Lynch has grown more health-conscious in recent years, a shift that may well have begun when, for reasons of his own, he went behind his beloved Bob's and climbed into its dumpster. "I found one of these cartons that milkshakes came from," says Lynch in the more recent interview clip above. "Every ingredient ended in -zene or -ate. There was nothing natural anywhere near that carton."

Even though that discovery put an end to Lynch's 2:30 appearances, all his coffee-soaked, sugar-saturated afternoons spent at Bob's had already filled him with ideas. One day, for example, "I saw a man come in. He came to the counter, and that's all I remember of this man, but from seeing him came a feeling, and that's where Frank Booth came from." Blue Velvet's psychotic, gas-huffing, Dennis Hopper-portrayed villain aside, Lynch fans who make their own pilgrimage to Bob's Big Boy even today will understand how well its sensibility may have resonated with the filmmaker's obvious attraction to midcentury Americana. But as we've learned from his life as well as his work, it's best not to go around back.

Related Content:

The Surreal Filmmaking of David Lynch Explained in 9 Video Essays

The Incredibly Strange Film Show: Revisit 1980s Documentaries on David Lynch, John Waters, Alejandro Jodorowsky & Other Filmmakers

An Animated David Lynch Explains Where He Gets His Ideas

David Lynch Explains How Meditation Boosts Our Creativity (Plus Free Resources to Help You Start Meditating)

Hear David Lynch Read from His New Memoir Room to Dream, and Browse His New Online T-Shirt Store

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities and culture. His projects include the book The Stateless City: a Walk through 21st-Century Los Angeles and the video series The City in Cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

How David Lynch Got Creative Inspiration? By Drinking a Milkshake at Bob’s Big Boy, Every Single Day, for Seven Straight Years is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

Terugblik: Moet een koop op afstand in originele staat retour?

IusMentis - 16 augustus 2018 - 8:14am

Deze en volgende week ben ik met vakantie. Daarom deze week een terugblik op populaire blogs van de afgelopen jaren, vanuit het perspectief van 2018.

Deze week: Moet een koop op afstand in originele staat retour?, met een respectable 200 reacties en nog steeds tienduizenden views per jaar.

Wie iets koopt bij een webwinkel, mag dit binnen zeven werkdagen terugdraaien. De winkelier moet het artikel dan terugnemen, en natuurlijk het geld teruggeven. Dat staat in de Wet Koop op Afstand, art. 7:46d BW. Het idee is dat je het product kunt uitproberen in die zeven werkdagen, om zo te besluiten of het bevalt of niet. Maar daarbij bestaat de kans dat het product (of de verpakking) beschadigd raakt. Mag je het dan nog terugsturen? En zo ja, mag de winkelier dan een deel van het geld houden als vergoeding voor die schade?

Hier is natuurlijk wel een en ander veranderd, sinds de grote update aan het consumentenrecht in 2012. De retourregeling uit de Wet koop op afstand staat nu elders, in artikel 6:230o BW. En die kent een termijn van veertien dagen, geen zeven werkdagen. En voor deze vraag het belangrijkste: de oude wet regelde niet expliciet hoe het zat met beschadiging door uitproberen. De nieuwe wet wel:

De consument is slechts aansprakelijk voor de waardevermindering van de zaak als een behandeling van de zaak verder is gegaan dan noodzakelijk om de aard, de kenmerken en de werking daarvan vast te stellen. De consument is niet aansprakelijk voor waardevermindering van de zaak wanneer de handelaar heeft nagelaten om overeenkomstig 230m lid 1, onderdeel h, informatie over het recht van ontbinding te verstrekken.

Kort gezegd: je mag wettelijk gezien kijken of het product voldoet aan de eisen (“uitproberen”) maar als je meer doet (“gebruiken”) en daardoor ontstaat schade, dan moet je die schade vergoeden. De discussie wat uitproberen is, blijft natuurlijk bestaan.

Ik gooi hem er toch weer eens in: een kopje koffie zetten met een espresso-apparaat via internet, is dat uitproberen of gebruiken?

Arnoud

Het bericht Terugblik: Moet een koop op afstand in originele staat retour? verscheen eerst op Ius Mentis.

New book: Do archives have value?

Do Archives Have Value? Edited by MICHAEL MOSS and DAVID THOMAS This book will explore ways of establishing value and measuring in the archives and specials collections. There is a vast literature about ways of measuring value for cultural heritage assets as a whole, particularly museums and visitor attractions, but archives and special collections in libraries have largely been overlooked.  They have been very poor at garnering statistical data and devising ways of measuring the impact of what they do, unlike museums and visitor attractions with their much heavier footfall.

Do Archives Have Value? discusses the various valuation methods available, including contingent valuation, willingness to pay and value chain, and assesses their suitability for use by archives and special collections. The book also assesses the impact of the transition to the digital in archival holdings, which will transform their character and will almost certainly cost more. The discussion will be set in the context of changing societal expectations of the archive in the wake of child abuse and other scandals where records to address grievances must be kept irrespective of cost.

 Value is explored in a range of different cultural and organizational contexts with case studies from a range of countries, including Australia, China, Japan, Malawi, Kenya, Russia and Thailand. There are contributions from Nancy Bell, Head of Conservation at The National Archives, Louise Craven, one of the leading UK archival scholars, Paul Lihoma, National Archivist of Malawi, Helen Morgan from the University of Melbourne, Pak Te Lee of the University of Hong Kong and Richard Wato from the National Archives of Kenya.

Key chapters include:
  • The value of the Clinton emails for research
  • The value of Russian archives before and after revolution
  • The value of archives in public inquiries – the case of the Hillsborough tragedy
  • The value of Find & Connect – Australia’s response to child abuse
  • The Chinese long tradition of record keeping
  • Why and how to value
  • Valuing digital content
  • The commercialization of archives.

New from Facet Publishing

 

white printing paper text

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

New Book: Archival Afterlives

Just out from Brill:

 

Archival Afterlives Life, Death, and Knowledge-Making in Early Modern British Scientific and Medical Archives Series: Scientific and Learned Cultures and Their Institutions, Volume: 23

 

Editors: Vera KellerAnna Marie Roos and Elizabeth Yale

“Archival Afterlives explores the posthumous fortunes of scientific and medical archives in early modern Britain. If early modern natural philosophers claimed all knowledge as their province, theirs was a paper empire. But how and why did naturalists engage with archives, and in particular, with the papers of their dead predecessors? This volume makes a firm case for expanding what counts as scientific labour, integrating scribes, archivist, library keepers, editors, and friends and family of deceased naturalists into the history of science. It shows how early modern natural philosophers pursued new natural knowledge in dialogue with their recent material past. Finally, it demonstrates the sustaining importance of archival institutions in the growth and development of the “New Sciences.”

Contributors are: Arnold Hunt, Michael Hunter, Vera Keller, Carol Pal, Anna Marie Roos, Richard Serjeantson, Victoria Sloyan, Alison Walker, and Elizabeth Yale.

Archival Afterlives

The "anti-intellectualism" of fascists

Leiter Reports: A Philosophy Blog - 15 augustus 2018 - 7:23pm
Jason Stanley (Yale) discusses at IHE, and makes a number of astute points. Brian Leiter

NASA Creates a Visualization That Sets Breathtaking Footage of the Moon to Claude Debussy’s “Clair de Lune” (Moonlight)

Open Culture - 15 augustus 2018 - 7:22pm

From NASA's Ernie Wright comes "Moonlight (Clair de Lune)," a visualization that takes beautiful images of the lunar terrain and sets them to Claude Debussy's 1905 composition, Clair de Lune (1905). Here's how Wright describes the project:

This visualization attempts to capture the mood of Claude Debussy's best-known composition, Clair de Lune (moonlight in French). The piece was published in 1905 as the third of four movements in the composer's Suite Bergamasque, and unlike the other parts of this work, Clair is quiet, contemplative, and slightly melancholy, evoking the feeling of a solitary walk through a moonlit garden. The visuals were composed like a nature documentary, with clean cuts and a mostly stationary virtual camera. The viewer follows the Sun throughout a lunar day, seeing sunrises and then sunsets over prominent features on the Moon. The sprawling ray system surrounding Copernicus crater, for example, is revealed beneath receding shadows at sunrise and later slips back into darkness as night encroaches. The visualization was created to accompany a performance of Clair de Lune by the National Symphony Orchestra Pops, led by conductor Emil de Cou, at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC, on June 1 and 2, 2018, as part of a celebration of NASA's 60th anniversary. The visualization uses a digital 3D model of the Moon built from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter global elevation maps and image mosaics. The lighting is derived from actual Sun angles during lunar days in 2018.

Enjoy...

via Aeon

Related Content:

Hear Debussy Play Debussy: A Vintage Recording from 1913

Pianist Plays Beethoven, Bach, Chopin, Ravel & Debussy for Blind Elephants in Thailand

Watch Classical Music Come to Life in Artfully Animated Scores: Stravinsky, Debussy, Bach, Beethoven, Mozart & More

NASA Creates a Visualization That Sets Breathtaking Footage of the Moon to Claude Debussy’s “Clair de Lune” (Moonlight) is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

The original Daily Mail URL for their article on the Ronell case: 'World-renounced-female-NYU-professor-facing-MeToo-moment.html'

Leiter Reports: A Philosophy Blog - 15 augustus 2018 - 5:49pm
They subsequently fixed it to "world-renowned," but that was a funny error! Brian Leiter

Gemeentefinanciering voor groene ondernemers

Binnenllands Bestuur - 15 augustus 2018 - 4:34pm
De Vereniging van Nederlandse Gemeenten (VNG) en BNG Bank zijn op zoek naar ondernemers met duurzame ideeën. Goede ideeën, die gemeentelijk duurzaamheidsbeleid ondersteunen, kunnen een lening vanaf 100.000 euro ontvangen. Inzenden kan tot en …

How Jean-Luc Godard Liberated Cinema: A Video Essay on How the Greatest Rule-Breaker in Film Made His Name

Open Culture - 15 augustus 2018 - 4:00pm

Few can think of the very concept of the auteur without thinking of Jean-Luc Godard. That goes for those of us exhilarated by his movies, those of us amused by them, those of us frustrated by them, and those of us who experience any combination of those emotions and more. Godard's early audiences, at the dawn of the French New Wave in the late 1950s and the decade or so thereafter, reacted in all those ways, and somehow time hasn't drained his work in that period of its power.

"How Jean-Luc Godard Liberated Cinema," the video essay from The Discarded Image above, shows us how a young filmmaker in mid-century France, working under severely limited environments and in a whole new postwar reality — cultural as well as economic — imbued them with that power. Starting with a bang, his 1959 feature debut Breathless, Godard took cinema, says Discarded Image creator Julian Palmer, and "tore through its foundations, reinventing the form and reinventing himself, picture by picture." This entailed "a haphazard ethos toward editing" as well as oscillation between "genre and the everyday, actors and non-professionals, black and white and color."

Godard "found the modern world, engulfed with commercialism, both appealing in its pop-art aesthetic, but also repellent," and his early films vividly express both halves of that worldview. All the while he "toys with the conventions of cinema," for example by severing the "umbilical cord" of the musical score, "making you aware of how you're being manipulated by his medium," and littering the frame with text, "often with abstract phrases, possibly just to provoke a reaction" — or, as some Godard enthusiasts might put it, definitely just to provoke a reaction.

The Godard films on which this video essay focuses — the formidable stretch from Breathless to 1967's Week-end, with pictures like Vivre sa vieContempt, and Alphaville in-between —  also draw deeply from cinema itself. "Movies surround these characters' lives, providing a contrast to their existence," says Palmer. "This fantasy can allow them to momentarily escape their reality." But as the 1960s became the 1970s, "like a film coming off its projector, Godard himself was coming off track. He was increasingly disgusted by consumer culture, which was only becoming more dominant."

Thereafter, as some critics see it, the delicate balance between Godard's politics and his aesthetics was overturned by the former, but his initial "manic period of fertile creation is still unmatched to this day, and Godard's influence is immeasurable." We should not only be thankful that Godard still makes films (his latest, The Image Book, won the very first "Special Palme d'Or" at this year's Cannes Film Festival), but also hope that the next generation of filmmakers continues to look to his example. Godard may have liberated cinema, but it always and everywhere threatens to put itself back in chains.

Related Content:

An Introduction to Jean-Luc Godard’s Innovative Filmmaking Through Five Video Essays

How the French New Wave Changed Cinema: A Video Introduction to the Films of Godard, Truffaut & Their Fellow Rule-Breakers

Jean-Luc Godard Takes Cannes’ Rejection of Breathless in Stride in 1960 Interview

The Entirety of Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless Artfully Compressed Into a 3 Minute Film

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities and culture. His projects include the book The Stateless City: a Walk through 21st-Century Los Angeles and the video series The City in Cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

How Jean-Luc Godard Liberated Cinema: A Video Essay on How the Greatest Rule-Breaker in Film Made His Name is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooksFree Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

Burgemeester Almere onderbreekt vakantie om geweld

Binnenllands Bestuur - 15 augustus 2018 - 2:56pm
Burgemeester Franc Weerwind van Almere heeft zijn vakantie onderbroken vanwege de vele geweldsincidenten in de stad. Dat meldt Omroep Flevoland.

Pagina's

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